Phrasal verb: rabbit on

Do you think this phrasal verb has a positive or negative meaning? Try listening to the video, before reading the definition, to see if you can work it out.
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rabbit on – [British English] INFORMAL DISAPPROVING to continue talking about something that is not interesting to the person you are talking to

Hmm…I wouldn’t be too happy if someone said this to me.
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Has anyone ever told you to stop rabbiting on? If so, what were you talking about? πŸ€”

If this post has been helpful, you might consider studying with S. and L. English Lessons.  Get in contact with Cathy today to organise your free trial lesson and let’s continue the conversation.

Phrasal verb: quieten down

This phrasal verb is fairly self-explanatory although the inclusion of the word ‘down’ may cause some confusion.

quieten down – [mainly British English] If someone or something quietens down, they become less noisy or less active.

In American English, ‘quiet down’ is more commonly used.
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When have you used this phrasal verb? Do you use it on a regular basis or is it something you rarely use?
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If this post has been helpful, you might consider studying with S. and L. English Lessons.  Get in contact with Cathy today to organise your free trial lesson and let’s continue the conversation.

Phrasal verb: put up with

Can you work out what this phrasal verb means?

put up with – to accept or continue to accept an unpleasant situation or experience, or someone who behaves unpleasantly

When have you had to put up with something? For how long did you have to put up with it? Perhaps you weren’t able to put up with it. So, what did you do?
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If this post has been helpful, you might consider studying with S. and L. English Lessons. Β Get in contactΒ with Cathy today to organise your freeΒ trial lessonΒ and let’s continue the conversation.

Phrasal verb: open up (Example 2)

The phrasal verb ‘open up’ can be used in a number of different ways in Business English.

In this video, ‘open up’ means that a new business (i.e. my English tutoring business, S. and L. English Lessons) started doing business.
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‘Open up’ can also mean:

** to start business at a particular time and be available to deal with customers
E.g. ‘S. and L. English Lessons opens up at 9 am Monday to Friday.’

** to make conditions easier for foreign companies to do business in a country
E.g. ‘After opening up its borders to trade, the country has enjoyed steady growth.’

** to create new opportunities
E.g. ‘S. and L. English Lessons offers online English lessons which has opened up opportunities to teach students anywhere in the world.’

** if a job opens up, it becomes available
E.g. ‘A marketing position has recently opened up in the company.’
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If this post has been helpful, you might consider studying with S. and L. English Lessons.  Get in contact with Cathy today to organise your free trial lesson and let’s continue the conversation.

Phrasal verb: open up (Example 1)

The phrasal verb ‘open up’ has a number of different meanings, but this is probably the most common one.

open up – to share information about yourself and your feelings

A private person doesn’t like to talk about their thoughts or feelings.
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An open person, on the other hand, is honest about what they think and does not try to keep things secret.
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Are you usually quite private, very open or somewhere in between?
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If this post has been helpful, you might consider studying with S. and L. English Lessons. Β Get in contactΒ with Cathy today to organise your freeΒ trial lessonΒ and let’s continue the conversation.

Phrasal verb: nag away at somebody

nag away at somebody – if something nags away at you, it worries or irritates you continuously

So, this sentence means that the person often worries about things a lot.
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Do things usually nag away at you? Is anything nagging away at you at the moment?
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If things often nag away at you, you could try using mindfulness to help you relax.
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If this post has been helpful, you might consider studying with S. and L. English Lessons.  Get in contact with Cathy today to organise your free trial lesson and let’s continue the conversation.

Phrasal verb: make up

make up – to become friendly with someone again after an argument or disagreement

Do you like to make up quickly or does it take you a while to calm down after arguing with someone?
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Calm down is a phrasal verb which means to stop feeling upset, angry or excited.
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If this post has been helpful, you might consider studying with S. and L. English Lessons.  Get in contact with Cathy today to organise your free trial lesson and let’s continue the conversation.

Phrasal verb: live for something/somebody

live for something/somebody – to care for something/somebody so much that they are your main reason for living

If you really love a particular activity, and you do it whenever you get the chance, you can say that you live for it.
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For example, some people live for golf and others live for tennis. Some people don’t have a passion for sport, but they may love to volunteer. People use this phrasal verb when they have a real passion for something or somebody.

My dad really lived for his family. We were the number one priority in his life.
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What do you live for?
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You can pop your answers in the comment section.
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If this post has been helpful, you might consider studying with S. and L. English Lessons.  Get in contact with Cathy today to organise your free trial lesson and let’s continue the conversation.

Phrasal verb: keep at something

keep at something – to continue to do something even though it is difficult or hard work

Once you have started something, do you prefer to keep at it until you have finished it or do you give up quickly, especially if things get a bit boring or difficult?
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Can you think of something that you were able to achieve because you kept at it?
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What was it and how long did it take you to achieve it? You can pop your answers in the comment section.

If this post has been helpful, you might consider studying with S. and L. English Lessons.  Get in contact with Cathy today to organise your free trial lesson and let’s continue the conversation.

Phrasal verb: jot something down

jot something down = to write something quickly on a piece of paper so that you remember it

I often jot things down, but then misplace the pieces of paper I’ve written them down on! πŸ˜• Do you ever do that? πŸ€”

Let’s make a list of the types of situations when we might need to jot something down. πŸ€“ πŸ€“

You can pop your suggestions in the comment section. πŸ‘‡ πŸ‘‡

If this post has been helpful, you might consider studying with S. and L. English Lessons.  Get in contact with Cathy today to organise your free trial lesson and let’s continue the conversation.ο»Ώ