Phrasal verb: zone out

Do you think it’s a good or a bad thing if someone zones out while you’re talking to them?

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zone out = to stop paying attention and not hear or see what is around you for a short period of time

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What things cause you to zone out?

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Phrasal verb: yield to

Before looking at the definition below, try and work out what the phrasal verb ‘yield to’ means.

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yield to = to agree to do something that you do not want to do or should not do

What things do you find difficult not to yield to?
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Phrasal verb: wind down (2)

This is another example of how the phrasal verb ‘wind down’ can be used. It’s very useful in business situations.
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wind down = [Business English] if a business, situation, activity, etc. winds down, or is wound down, it gradually ends

Many businesses are having to wind down during these tough economic times. Do you know of any business that have wound down?
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Phrasal verb: wind down

‘Wind’ is a tricky word as it can be pronounced in two different ways in English, with a short ‘i’ and a long ‘i’. How do you think it is pronounced in this phrasal verb?

In this phrasal verb ‘wind’ is pronounced with a long ‘i’.

wind down – to gradually relax after doing something that has made you tired or worried

How do you like to wind down after a stressful day?
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Phrasal verb: veg out

Listen to the video and then choose one of three sentences below.

(a) The guy wanted to eat vegetables and watch the television.

(b) The girl wanted to relax and watch some T.V.

(c) The guy wanted to relax and watch the television.

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veg out – [INFORMAL] to relax and do very little

If you chose (c), you’re spot on. πŸ˜‰

How often do you veg out? 😍

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Phrasal verb: use up something

This is a very common phrasal verb which you could probably use nearly every day.
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use up something – to use all of something, so that nothing is left

I usually try to use up food (you can also say ‘use food up’) before its Best Before date, but I think it’s okay to eat it even after this date.
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How about you? Do you ever eat food after its Best Before date? What about the Use By date? Should you always use up food before its Use By date?
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Phrasal verb: tuck something away

Have a guess what this phrasal verb means before checking the definition below.

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tuck something away – to put something in a private, safe place

Some people say that they like to keep something tucked away for ‘a rainy day’. Have you heard this expression before? What does it mean? Choose one of the following sentences:

(a) They’re saving some money now in case they need it in the future.

(b) They’re keeping their money under their bed sheet until it rains.

(c) They need to buy a brolly (i.e. umbrella) because it’s raining.

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Phrasal verb: tuck somebody in

A variation of this phrasal verb is ‘tuck somebody up’ which is used in British English.

tuck somebody in – to make someone comfortable in bed, especially a child, by arranging the covers around them

This is a popular phrasal verb and is used in many English-speaking countries. Do you say something similar in your own language? Did you enjoy being tucked in when you were a child or do you prefer doing the tucking in?

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Phrasal verb: tuck in

The meaning of ‘tuck in’ used in this context is British English and is commonly used in many Commonwealth countries. In addition, ‘tucker’ means ‘food’ in Australia. πŸ‘πŸ˜‰

tuck in [also ‘tuck into something’] = to start eating something enthusiastically
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Has anyone ever told you to ‘tuck in’? Where were you and what kind of meal was it? 🍽πŸ₯™
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Phrasal verb: shop around

‘Making an expensive purchase’ is another way of saying ‘buying something expensive’.

shop around – to compare the price and quality of the same or similar items in a variety of shops before deciding which one to buy

Do you usually shop around before buying something expensive?
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What was the last thing you shopped around for? πŸ€”

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